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What is the significance of The Aeneid ending in a moment of an un-granted plea for pity by Turnus and an unwavering rage in the hero of the story?

What is the significance of The Aeneid ending in a moment of an un-granted plea for pity by Turnus and an unwavering rage in the hero of the story?

Now that you have finished reading Books 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, & 12 of The Aeneid, please select and discuss either Option A (Concept of Virtue) or Option B (The Final Scene of Fury and Rage). (Prior to responding, you may also want to revisit The Aeneid PowerPoint in our D2L shell.)

Be sure to address each question within the option that you select. Your response should be a minimum of 270-300 words long. You must explain/support your responses (a ‘yes’ or ‘no’ with no support/explanation is not acceptable). Also remember that you must support your discussion with 1 to 3 quotes from the story (so, as usual, include in-text citations). Please strive for good grammar, spelling, and punctuation. In the title of your post, please identify which option you are discussing. And, finally, remember that you must comment on at least two other students’ posts.

(Note: If you have other comments you’d like to add in addition to the questions I asked you to address, please feel free to do so. My questions are prompts to get the discussions started.)

Option A: Consider the concept of virtue. Discuss the following questions when discussing this:

  • What is Aeneas’s greatest virtue?
  • What is Turnus’s greatest virtue?
  • Likewise, what are their greatest vices or weaknesses?
  • Is the essential difference between Aeneas and Turnus a virtue or a vice?

Option B: Consider the final scene: no pity, only fury and rage. Discuss the following questions when discussing this:

At the end of the epic, Turnus pleads to Aeneas: “Seize your moment now. Or if / some care for a parent’s grief can touch you still, / I pray you—you had such a father, in old Anchises– / pity Daunus [Turnus’s father] in his old age and send me back to my own people [. . .]” (ll. 1085-89).

  • What is the significance of The Aeneid ending in a moment of an un-granted plea for pity by Turnus and an unwavering rage in the hero of the story?
  • By ending the epic with this scene, what type of statement do you think Virgil might have been trying to make about Rome?
  • In a similar vein, what might this imply in philosophical terms (from Virgil’s perspective)?

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